Our House is on Fire: Join Jane Fonda’s Fire Drill Fridays

After 14 weeks of climate protests in Washington, D.C., Fire Drill Fridays are moving to California to continue to demand urgent climate action — and we want YOU to join us by launching your very own Fire Drill Fridays in your community!

Jane Fonda and the Fire Drill Fridays team will be holding monthly Fire Drills in different cities in CA, so stay tuned: http://bit.ly/311XKxs

Working with Jane, Greenpeace is partnering with allies across California and beyond to push for a Green New Deal, no new fossil fuels, and a rapid and just transition off of fossil fuels and toward a renewable energy economy.

Fire Drill Fridays is inspired by the global movement of youth climate strikers, who have helped reshape the narrative around climate urgency. Greta Thunberg and others put a call-out to adults to show up in a bigger way — and we’re answering that call.

Featured in the video, chronologically:

Jerome Foster II is the Executive Director & Founder of OneMillionOfUs, the National US Co-Coordinator of Greta Thunberg’s FridaysForFuture movement, and a Harvard University Dual Enrollment High School Student.

Eriel Tchekwie Deranger is a Dënesųłiné woman (ts’ékui), member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation and Executive Director of Indigenous Climate Action.

Reverend William J Barber is an American Protestant minister and political activist. He is a member of the national board of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the chair of its Legislative Political Action Committee.

Dolores Huerta is an American labor leader and civil rights activist who, with Cesar Chavez, is a co-founder of the National Farmworkers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers.

Naomi Klein is a Canadian author, social activist, and filmmaker known for her political analyses and criticism of corporate globalization and of capitalism.

Annie Leonard is the Executive Director of Greenpeace USA, an independent environmental organization which uses research, creative communication, non violent direct action, and people-power to advance environmental solutions.

Jane Fonda is an American actress, writer and activist, and the founder of and spokesperson for Fire Drill Fridays. SOURCE

“Stop the Money Pipeline”: 150 Arrested at Protests Exposing Wall Street’s Link to Climate Crisis

Nearly 150 people were arrested on Capitol Hill Friday in a climate protest led by Academy Award-winning actor and activist Jane Fonda.

Fonda has been leading weekly climate demonstrations in Washington, D.C., known as “Fire Drill Fridays,” since October. For her last and 14th protest, actors Martin Sheen and Joaquin Phoenix, indigenous anti-pipeline activist Tara Houska, journalist Naomi Klein and dozens more lined up to get arrested as they demanded a mass uprising and swift political action to thwart the climate crisis.

Fonda then marched with supporters down Pennsylvania Avenue to a Chase Bank branch where environmentalist Bill McKibben and dozens of others were occupying the space to draw attention to the bank’s ties to the fossil fuel industry.

Ten, including McKibben, were arrested. The day of action was the launch of “Stop the Money Pipeline,” a campaign to halt the flow of cash from banks, investment firms and insurance companies to the fossil fuel industry.

“Let us remember that we are not the criminals,” Naomi Klein told a crowd of protesters. “The criminals are the people who are letting this world burn for money.”

….The day of action was the launch of the “Stop the Money Pipeline” campaign to halt the flow of cash from banks, investment firms and insurance companies to the fossil fuel industry. The day of protests began with Jane Fonda outside the Capitol.

TRANSCRIPT

Climate Movement Takes Aim at Wall Street, Because ‘Money Is Only Language Fossil Fuel Industry Speaks

“Stop the Money Pipeline” campaign demands that banks, insurers, and asset managers cut ties with planet-destroying companies.

STMP image

Stop the Money Pipeline, a new campaign from climate activists, aims to convince Wall Street to stop financing the fossil fuel industry. (Image: Stop the Money Pipeline)

Climate activists on Thursday announced a new campaign that aims to send a message to Wall Street: “Stop financing fossil fuels and deforestation and start respecting human rights and Indigenous sovereignty.”

“Money is the only language that the fossil fuel industry speaks.” —Ka Hswa Wa, EarthRights International

Organized by a coalition of climate, youth, and Indigenous groups, Stop the Money Pipeline will officially launch Friday at the final event in a weekly civil disobedience series that actor and activist Jane Fonda kicked off in October called Fire Drill Fridays.

Several vocal climate campaigners plan to join Fonda at the Friday launch, including celebrities Martin Sheen and Joaquin Phoenix, Indigenous leaders Tara Houska and Eriel Deranger, Greenpeace USA executive director Annie Leonard, and authors and activists Naomi Klein and Bill McKibben.

— Fire Drill Fridays (@FireDrillFriday)

Join the #FireDrillFriday 🔥 teach-in on Thursday with @Janefonda, @greenpeaceusa‘s @AnnieMLeonard, @350‘s @billmckibben, & @Indigenous_ca‘s @erieltd.

This will be the last teach-in before Jane returns to LA.

Tune in at 7pm ET: https://t.co/qX7b5UYr1x

Art by Sarah Epperson pic.twitter.com/wqPYR1rLT3

Artwork for Fire Drill Friday's Thursday teach-in hosted by Jane Fonda

January 8, 2020

Like previous weeks, before the Friday rally and protest there will be a Thursday night livestreamed teach-in, which will feature Deranger, Leonard, and McKibben.

McKibben co-founded the global environmental advocacy group 350.org, which announced Stop the Money Pipeline in a joint statement from organizers Thursday.

“A chorus of high profile voices—including scientists, the United Nations, European central banks, and the IMF—have all sounded the alarm about the role of the finance industry in driving climate destruction, but so far their calls for action have fallen on deaf ears,” the statement said. “The Stop the Money Pipeline mobilization will bring together a number of existing campaigns targeting the worst offenders in each part of the financial sector.”

“We cannot solve the climate crisis until banks and insurance companies step up and stop financing environmental destruction.”
—Liz Butler, Friends of the Earth U.S.

Liz Butler, vice president of organizing and strategic alliances at Friends of the Earth U.S., explained that “climate chaos is already decimating the world, from worsening wildfires to widespread flooding and devastating droughts. Wall Street banks and insurance companies are fueling this crisis by pumping billions of dollars into fossil fuel projects that destroy local communities and our environment.”

“We cannot solve the climate crisis until banks and insurance companies step up and stop financing environmental destruction. They must slash their financing for fossil fuel projects and end the abuses of frontline communities worldwide,” Butler added.

Carroll Muffett, president at the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), highlighted some conditions frontline communities currently face and the ongoing legal actions that aim to hold polluters financially liable for wrecking the planet.

“With Australia burning and Jakarta underwater, the science is clear that every new investment in fossil fuels is committing the world to climate chaos and human rights violations on a massive scale,” he said. “Fossil fuel producers are already being held accountable in courtrooms around the world. The financial sector should take note, take action or take cover.”

Other group involved in Stop the Money Pipeline include Rainforest Action Network (RAN), Sierra Club, Greenpeace USA, Sunrise Project, Future Coalition, Divest Ed, Divest-Invest, Native Movement, Giniw Collective, Transition U.S., Oil Change International, 350 Seattle, EarthRights International, Union of Concerned Scientists, Majority Action, The YEARS Project, and Amazon Watch.

While the campaign’s broad demand is that “banks, asset managers, and insurance companies stop funding, insuring, and investing in climate destruction,” the advocacy organizations have identified three primary and initial targets: JPMorgan Chase, BlackRock, and Liberty Mutual.

top targets

 

“As the world’s largest investor in fossil fuel companies, BlackRock is effectively financing disinformation campaigns that have delayed climate action for decades,” declared Kathy Mulvey, a campaign director at the Union of Concerned Scientists. “Investors need to expect more and tolerate less from fossil fuel companies—and tell them to swiftly get on board with climate action, or get out of the way.”

BlackRock announced Thursday that it is joining the Climate Action 100+ investor initiative. Members of the BlackRock’s Big Problem network responded by calling the move a “first step in the right direction” and urging the firm to “go beyond words and actually make meaningful changes to the way it wields its power.”

According to the tenth annual Fossil Fuel Finance Report Cardreleased in March 2019 by RAN and other groups, 33 global banks have collectively poured at least $1.9 trillion into the fossil fuel industry since world leaders adopted the Paris climate agreement in December 2015. The report card identified Chase as the bank that gave the most to coal, gas, and oil companies from 2016 to 2018.

“Our government won’t move on climate so we have to move our money. The fossil fuel industry can’t survive without its friends on Wall Street.”—Clara Vondrich, Divest-Invest

“Banks around the globe are betting against our future with every dollar they invest in fossil fuels,” Greenpeace USA climate campaign director Janet Redman said Thursday. “Money is the oxygen on which the climate crisis burns—and we need everyone to care where their money is being spent.”

As EarthRights International executive director Ka Hswa Wa put it: “Money is the only language that the fossil fuel industry speaks. For decades, the industry’s game has been to pursue profit recklessly while shifting the costs onto local communities. Today, we have come together to announce that the rules of the game have changed and fossil fuel companies will be held accountable.”

Organizers see Stop the Money Pipeline as the next phase of the global movement fighting for divestment from fossil fuels and investment in renewable energy, which has secured commitments from over 1,150 institutions with more than $12 trillion in total assets, according to a real-time tracker from 350.org’s Fossil Free project.

“The international movement calling for divestment from dirty fossil fuels is only growing louder and stronger, and major financial institutions should take note,” said Lena Moffitt, senior director of the Sierra Club’s Our Wild America campaign. “It’s time for them to stop pouring money into the projects that are driving the climate crisis and commit to investing in a future that benefits our communities, our economies, our health, and our planet.”

Divest-Invest director Clara Vondrich emphasized the added importance of pressuring major financial players to take action to address the climate emergency given that global governments continue to drag their feet.

“Our government won’t move on climate so we have to move our money. The fossil fuel industry can’t survive without its friends on Wall Street,” Vondrich said. “Without loans, insurance and investment, Big Oil dries up. Money talks, and we can walk. Wall Street caused the financial crash. We won’t let it cause the climate crash.” SOURCE

Jane Fonda speaks to CBC’s Susan Ormiston

Actor Jane Fonda tells CBC’s Susan Ormiston who inspired her to protest again and what she learned from her earlier agitating years.

Image result for cbc: Jane Fonda speaks to CBC's Susan Ormiston

WATCH THE VIDEO

Jane Fonda talks protest, arrest — and why she wants another night in jail

‘It’s quite an experience to know that you are powerless’

Jane Fonda is arrested by U.S. Capitol Police officers during a Fire Drill Friday climate change protest Nov. 1. (Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters)

Jane Fonda’s hoping for an unusual birthday present — another night in a Washington, D.C., jail.

The award-winning actress and businesswoman has decamped to Washington from Los Angeles to protest against climate change.

“I decided I needed to leave my comfort zone and put my body on the line, engage in civil disobedience and risk getting arrested because we need to step up with bolder actions. It’s a real crisis,” she told CBC’s Susan Ormiston.

Fire Drill Fridays were inspired by climate activist Greta Thunberg. Since Sept. 27, Fonda has joined a group of protesters engaging in civil disobedience; she’s been arrested four times and jailed once, overnight.

“It’s quite an experience to know that you are powerless, that you have been handcuffed and that you were completely in the control of the police,” she said.

“Because I’m white and famous, I’m not going to be treated badly.”

She said her jailers couldn’t believe she was there voluntarily. She admits the power of protest will not change policy overnight but she brings “celebrity,” which is important, she says, to motivate others to act on their convictions and get out to protest the climate crisis.

Watch an excerpt of Susan Ormiston’s interview with Jane Fonda:

Jane Fonda has been arrested four times in recent weeks for protesting climate change. “I’m following in the steps of young people,” she tells The National’s Susan Ormiston. 2:09

Jane Fonda has been arrested four times in recent weeks for protesting climate change. “I’m following in the steps of young people,” she tells The National’s Susan Ormiston. 2:09

Fonda is no stranger to activism. Over 50 years she’s demonstrated for women’s and Indigenous rights, and against the Iraq war and Alberta’s oilsands.

She was first arrested in the early 1970s for her opposition to the war in Vietnam. She was dubbed Hanoi Jane after posing with the North Vietnamese and later apologized. But back then, she was seen as a disruptor and was apprehended crossing into the U.S. from Canada.

“You know, the more they attacked me, the more I dug in my heels. If they thought I was some soft Hollywood starlet daughter of Henry Fonda and they could bully me, no, I wasn’t gonna let them get me. I just kept going,” she told CBC.

Does she still feel that way?

“Oh yeah,” says Fonda, “Only see, now I’m old and so I feel even more capable of standing up.”

She just might celebrate her 82nd birthday this Saturday locked up again.

Jane Fonda leads climate change protests, plans to get arrested on her birthday

 


Photograph: Arthur Mola/Invision/AP

Two-time Academy Award and seven-time Golden Globe winner Jane Fonda has played many roles, most recently on television as the wife of a gay husband who comes out about his closeted relationship with his best friend…

But this week, Fonda takes on the role of climate activist and brings it to a new stage: the Capitol, where she will demonstrate until she is arrested. And she will do the same thing for 14 Fridays – until she has to film another season of the television drama “Grace and Frankie.”

“I’m going to take my body, which is kind of famous and popular right now because of the [television] series and I’m going to go to D.C. and I’m going to have a rally every Friday,” Fonda said in an interview with The Washington Post. “It’ll be called ‘Fire Drill Friday.’ And we’re going to engage in civil disobedience and we’re going to get arrested every Frida

Call her the Greta Thunberg of the octogenarian set

The 16-year-old Thunberg, a Swedish high school student, has rocked the world with her blunt denunciations of generations that have failed to slow climate change. The 81-year-old Fonda, who says she was moved reading about Thunberg, says she believes she can have her own impact.

When Thunberg studied climate change, “she realised what was happening and that this was barrelling at us like an engine,” Fonda said. “It so traumatised her that she stopped speaking and eating. And when I read that it rocked me, because I knew that Greta had seen the truth. And the urgency came into my DNA the way it hadn’t before.”

“Greta said we have to behave like it’s a crisis,” Fonda added. “We have to behave like our houses are on fire.”

Fonda has a distinguished acting career, including political films such as “Coming Home” about Vietnam War wounds both mental and physical, “9 to 5” about working women, and “The China Syndrome” about a nuclear power plant that was released shortly before the Three Mile Island nuclear accident.

This time Fonda is planning to go about things differently

Every Thursday evening, starting Oct. 17, there will be online teach-ins featuring climate scientists talking about different aspects of global warming. Fonda said she would like to “draw connections” by discussing how violence against women increases in communities suffering from climate change.

Then on Fridays, she will go to the steps of the Capitol building holding a placard and will refuse to obey three requests by the Capitol Police to cease and desist. She’s not expecting a mass rally, more like a handful of people.

Actress and activist Jane Fonda talks to a crowd of protestors during a global climate rally at Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, Sept. 20, 2019. A wave of climate change protests swept across the globe Friday, with hundreds of thousands of young people sending a message to leaders headed for a U.N. summit: The warming world can’t wait for action. (AP Photo/David Swanson)
This Friday’s launch coincides with bigger protests scheduled worldwide

She has invited some of her celebrity friends: Actor Ted Danson of “Cheers” fame, who has become involved in ocean conservation; “The Vagina Monologues” playwright Eve Ensler; and actresses Kyra Sedgwick and Catherine Keener.

She’s reached out to leaders of Black Lives Matter and the Sunrise Movement. Ben Cohen, co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, will join the demonstrations, which will start at 11 a.m. Fridays on the side of the Capitol facing the Supreme Court.

Fonda said she also intends to make demands

“The number one thing is cutting all funding and permits for new developments for fossil fuel and exports and processing and refining,” she said. She said that if efforts go into discouraging demand for oil and gas and coal, “it’s not going to do any good” if companies are still developing prospects. “It’s not going to make any difference,” she said.

Fonda also wants to get out the vote, not only for presidential ballots but also down to local government to make climate policy a litmus test.

People take part during the Climate Strike, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019 in New York. Young people afraid for their futures protested around the globe Friday to implore leaders to tackle climate change, turning out by the hundreds of thousands to insist that the warming world can’t wait for action. (AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez)

It’s not Fonda’s first climate protest

In 2016, she spent Thanksgiving with protesters gathered in an effort to block an oil pipeline through land claimed by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota. She has protested in Los Angeles, Vancouver and Seattle.

But she said she wanted to “step it up” after reading two books: Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz’s book “People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent” and Naomi Klein’s “On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal.”

Klein opens her book with an essay about Thunberg and her Asperger’s syndrome. Fonda says it showed her that some people on the autism spectrum are “totally laser focused” and “information comes at them pure and direct.”

“It’s as simple as this. We have according to the [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] 12 years, but that was a year ago,” Fonda says. “So according to their report we have 11 years left. Eleven years to do something that has never been done in human history. And if we don’t do it, huge parts of the planet are going to be uninhabitable, by the way.”

Fire Drill Fridays@FireDrillFriday

Vote, speak & act in support of the demands of youth climate strikers:

🔥A Green New Deal
🔥Respect of Indigenous Land & Sovereignty
🔥Environmental Justice
🔥Protection & Restoration of Biodiversity
🔥Implementation of Sustainable Agriculture

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