Jagmeet Singh’s call for fossil fuels ban leapfrogs the Leap Manifesto

“The NDP is coming late to the issue of dealing comprehensively with climate change. Can it compete effectively with Elizabeth May’s Greens on this front? We shall see.” – Thomas Walkom

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on May 7 in Ottawa. “The NDP is coming late to the issue of dealing comprehensively with climate change. Can it compete effectively with Elizabeth May’s Greens on this front?” asks Thomas Walkom.
Jagmeet Singh’s New Democrats have discovered climate change. 

The party had been reluctant to take too uncompromising a stand on global warming for fear of alienating potential voters. That reluctance has gone.

Now the NDP is calling for an end to the entire fossil-fuel industry in Canada.

“The future of our country cannot involve fracking,” Singh said Monday in Ottawa, referring to a controversial method of drilling for oil and natural gas. “It cannot involve the burning of any fossil fuel.”

He said Canada must adhere to carbon reduction targets that are much stricter than those proposed by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government if it to seriously fight climate change.

And he declared that he now opposes ambitious plans by British Columbia’s NDP government to build a massive liquefied natural gas project in the province’s north.

[In the past] the Leap Manifesto’s call to ban any new fossil-fuel energy projects, from pipelines to fracking, was seen as too radical. No more. Now, with his call for a Canada free of fossil fuels, Singh has outleapt the Leapers. MORE

 

Canada: climate change threat could herald ‘dawn of new era’ for Green party

“A poll last week found 35 per cent of Canadians “are planning to vote for a party because they dislike another party even more and want to prevent that party from winning.” That was true for 40 per cent of supporters for both the Liberals and Conservatives. All because Trudeau broke a firm promise to have proportional representation in place for the fall election.”

 

Elizabeth May and her party believe voters are ready to ‘vote for real change’ in the upcoming federal election in October


 Elizabeth May, the leader of Canada’s Green party. Photograph: Darryl Dyck/AP

Elections have rarely been kind to Canada’s long-suffering Green party. Though many voters view it as the environmental conscience of the country, they often abandon it when it comes time to cast their ballot and the party’s leader Elizabeth May has sometimes been forced to fight for a place in debates between party leaders.

But as Canada confronts the effects of climate change, May and her party firmly believe the upcoming federal election in October will be different.

The Green’s growing strength was highlighted this week, when Paul Manly won a closely-watched regional election in British Columbia, taking the Nainamo seat from the leftwing New Democratic party, and forcing Justin Trudeau’s Liberal party into fourth place. He will become the federal Green party’s second MP.

May hailed Monday’s the victory as “the dawn of a new era in federal politics” which proved voters were “brave to vote for real change”.

The recent successes come amid growing recognition of the impacts of climate change in Canada. A recent government report has found that the country is warming at a rate twice that of the global average.

Carbon taxes and environment have moved to the centre of the country’s national discourse, and May is well-positioned to capitalize on growing frustration among voters, said Lori Turnbull, a professor of political science at Dalhousie University.

“May can run circles around the [leaders] on the carbon tax. She’s really an excellent, speaker and debater and she’s got more experienced in any of them in terms of running the federal party and being on the campaign trail,” said Turnbull. MORE

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Once an ‘orange diaper baby,’ Manly begins life as a Green MP
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NDP unveils parts of climate plan in motion as the Green Party edges closer
Greens’ Dramatic Byelection Win Reveals Much about October Vote

 

Green Party win in B.C. shows climate issues could impact October

Canadians are serious about climate change, something that has largely escaped neoliberal parties. Perhaps this is a turning point.

Newly elected Paul Manly expects support to grow ahead of federal election

Green Party supporters hope Paul Manly’s byelection win signifies the clout which climate issues will carry in October’s federal election. (Chad Hipolito/Canadian Press)

British Columbia voters sent a message that Canadians are deeply concerned about the environment and climate issues will be at the forefront in October’s federal election campaign, jubilant Green Party supporters said Monday night.

Voters in Nanaimo elected Paul Manly of the Greens as their new member of Parliament, barely six months before October’s federal vote.

With 96 per cent of polls reporting in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection, Manly received 37.1 per cent of the vote.

John Hirst, the Conservative candidate, was a distant second with 25.1 per cent of the vote. The NDP polled 22.9 per cent and Liberal candidate Michelle Corfield received 11.1 per cent of the vote.

“People really want to see action on climate change,” said Manly, who called his victory “historic.”
British Columbia voters sent a message that Canadians are deeply concerned about the environment and climate issues will be at the forefront in October’s federal election campaign, jubilant Green Party supporters said Monday night.

Voters in Nanaimo elected Paul Manly of the Greens as their new member of Parliament, barely six months before October’s federal vote.

Green Party wins federal byelection in Nanaimo-Ladysmith
With 96 per cent of polls reporting in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection, Manly received 37.1 per cent of the vote.

John Hirst, the Conservative candidate, was a distant second with 25.1 per cent of the vote. The NDP polled 22.9 per cent and Liberal candidate Michelle Corfield received 11.1 per cent of the vote.

“People really want to see action on climate change,” said Manly, who called his victory “historic.”

Manly will become the second Green Party member in Parliament, joining Leader Elizabeth May.

His victory shows the other parties that Canadians are serious about climate change, Manly said, adding he expects the Green wave of support to grow in the October election. MORE

RELATED:

Greens coast to victory in Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection