The world is facing a climate emergency (but, of course, not in Prince Edward County)

Prince Edward Councillors should hang their heads in shame.

Todd Smith photo
Todd Smith, Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade, whose claim to fame is stifling employment and sustainable development in Prince Edward County by shutting down the White Pines Wind Project that consists of 9 wind turbines with a nameplate capacity of 18.45 megawatts (MW) of emissions-free renewable energy .

Climate emergency?  What climate emergency?

Where is the county’s climate emergency plan? Where is the coordinated leadership to address climate mitigation and to inspire conservation, green growth and climate action? Where is the County’s New Green Deal?

”You are not mature enough to tell it like it is. Even that burden you leave to your children.” @GretaThuberg

While  100+ Cities Commit to Clean with 100% Renewable Energy and cities are leading the fight against climate disaster–not in Prince Edward, where councillors sleep the good sleep after filling potholes. Time for leadership? Not so much.


Save The White Pines Wind Project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate emergency demands less traffic, more walkable cities


Wikimedia Commons photo of Paris street

The climate emergency exploded onto the headlines in 2018, with a relentless series of disasters leading up to the UN COP 24 climate conference in December. But the people cutting climate pollution by creating delightful urban spaces on an unprecedented scale should be headline news in 2019.

I experienced some of this climate action in October, joining throngs of Paris residents enjoying warm fall days on the new linear park along the River Seine. At the time the national government of France was in court attempting to get this well-loved park turned back into the noisy, congested national highway it was previously (except during summer festivals). The court ruled in favor of year-round access and climate action while I was in Spain.

Photo of busy riverside park in Paris, which was formerly a highway, by Eric Doherty

 

Anne Hidalgo is the Mayor of Paris and Chair of C40 Cities, a group of large city governments committed to the most ambitious goals of the Paris Agreement. “Cities have been the loudest voices calling for bold and urgent climate action, because we are conscious of the threat it poses to our citizens […] Cities are ready to lead on the transformations necessary to secure the future that we want” said Hildago in a C40 media release.

Hildago is aiming to rapidly cut automobile traffic by 50 per cent, and has already cut traffic volumes significantly. Paris’s successes have largely been achieved by re-allocating space to transit lanes, protected bicycle lanes, pedestrianized streets and plazas, and most famously by creating linear parks along the River Seine. These actions are popular, and not just because they create nicer urban spaces and reduce local air pollution. MORE