ON THE SCRAP HEAP ‘Topple The Racists’ map: Full list of statues Black Lives Matter protesters want removed and why

In Picton, there was an incredible turnout to protest police violence. 

A peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstation on Picton’s Main Street on Friday night drew around 1,000 people all calling for an end to systemic racisim. For nearly three hours participants stood in silent solidarity with those protesting racisim in cities around the world. (Desirée DeCoste/Gazette Staff)

This week, the Picton Gazette (June 10) reported, “Peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstration draws in over 1,000“.

The irony, of course, is that the statue of Sir John A. Macdonald “Holding Court” is still displayed steps away in front of the Picton Library with no explanation of his role as the architect of Indigenous genocide, his role as instigator of the political murder of Metis leader, Louis Riel, and the architect of the theft of Indigenous land and resources enforced by a miltarized police.

A teachable moment squandered

Nation-building for Macdonald ment the development of a Constitution for white male Christians only; a Constitution that excluded women, First Nations, Metis and Innu— a constitution that embeded cultural genocide for First Nations.

Will Prince Edward Council finally assume its responsibility to address racism?

 

PROTESTERS want more than 100 statues and street names across the UK taken down because of their racist associations.

A map showing all of the “racist” statues in Britain include memorials of Captain Cook and Wetherspoons pubs named after slave owners has been put up on a website called Topple the Racists.

 A statue of Robert Milligan, an 18th century Scottish merchant who owned 526 slaves at his Jamaican sugar plantation, stands outside the Museum of the Docklands near Canary Wharf

A statue of Robert Milligan, an 18th century Scottish merchant who owned 526 slaves at his Jamaican sugar plantation, stands outside the Museum of the Docklands near Canary WharfCredit: Getty Images – Getty

The tearing down of Edward Colston‘s statue in Bristol sparked a furious debate over which people get honoured with memorials in Britain.

And a statue in London of 18th century slave trader Robert Milligan was taken down on Tuesday, June 9.

The website was published by the Stop Trump coalition in support of the Black Lives Matter protests and maps out more than 100 statues across Britain which pay tribute to slave traders and “racists”.

The group said: “We believe these statues and other memorials to slave-owners and colonialists need to be removed so that Britain can finally face the truth about its past – and how it shapes our present.”

What statutes do protesters want taking down and why?

Winston Churchill

 The statue to Winston Churchill in central London was targeted by Black Lives Matter protesters

The statue to Winston Churchill in central London was targeted by Black Lives Matter protestersCredit: PA:Press Association

The statue commemorating the wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill was vandalised by Black Lives Matter protesters on D-Day this year.

The statue in Parliament Square, central London was targeted and smeared with graffiti claiming he “was a racist”.

Just a few days later another Churchill statue, in Woodford Green in northeast London, was vandalised.

The commemorative statue was erected in 1959 after Churchill served as MP for the area from 1924 to 1964

Christopher Columbus

 Protesters want statue of Christopher Columbus, famed explorer, to be taken down

Protesters want statue of Christopher Columbus, famed explorer, to be taken downCredit: Alamy

One of the statues they want taken down is famed explorer Christopher Columbus, which sits in Belgrave Square in London..

The explorer was called the founder of the “New World” but protesters want his statue torn down for his exploitation and colonisation of  the Americas.

An older understanding of the “discovery” of the Americas praised Columbus’ expedition as a great triumph and bringing huge wealth to Spain and other European countries through pillaging the land.

But more recent histories of the adventurer have focused on the slave trade in the Americas and the imported European diseases which wiped out indigenous peoples of the Caribbean region and American continents.

Historians have credited Columbus’ “discovery” of the Americas as the beginning of the slaughter of 3 million people – and his statue in North End Park in Boston, US, was decapitated on June 10.

A young priest who transcribed Columbus journals’ wrote: “There were 60,000 people living on this island, including the Indians; so that from 1494 to 1508, over 3,000,000 people had perished from war, slavery, and the mines.

“Who in future generations will believe this? I myself writing it as a knowledgeable eyewitness can hardly believe it.”

Thomas Guy

 Black Lives Matter supporters have identified UK statues they want removed for 'celebrating slavery and racism' including statue of Thomas Guy

Black Lives Matter supporters have identified UK statues they want removed for ‘celebrating slavery and racism’ including statue of Thomas GuyCredit: Gavin Rodgers/ Pixel8000

Thomas Guy was a philanthropist who founded Guys’ Hospital in London.

A King’s College London campus is named after him and a statue in Southwark pays tribute to him.

He was member of Parliament for Tamworth from 1695 to 1707; he also was chosen sheriff of London but declined to serve.

Guy made his fortune from the slave trade.

He owned shares in the South Sea Company, who sourced slaves via the Royal African Company.

Before the share price crashed in 1720, Guy sold his at peak price and amassed a fortune.

The SSC was responsible for the transportation of about 64,000 African slaves between 1715 and 1731.

According to the website set up by the protesters, the company also had contracts to kidnap people and deliver them to Jamaica.

Henry Dundas

Henry Dundas, the First Viscount Melville, has a statue in St Andrew’s Square and protesters also want streets bearing his name changed.

Dundas was a politician who studied at the University of Edinburgh.

According to protesters: “He was solely responsible for delaying the abolition of slavery in 1792, causing another 15 years of people being kidnapped, shipped to, and enslaved in Britain (that’s around 630,000 more people) from which he directly benefited from.”

Dundas was also the first lord of the Admiralty and he was accused of misappropriating public money.

Though he was acquitted, he never again held office.

Robert Peel

 A statue of Sir Robert Peel protesters want taken down

A statue of Sir Robert Peel protesters want taken down
Credit: London News Pictures 

Sir Robert Peel was the British Prime Minister from 1834-35 and then again from 1841-46.

Sir Robert was the son of a wealthy cotton manufacturer, also called Robert Peel.

There is some confusion among protesters over which Robert Peel they are railing against.

They claim Sir Robert petitioned against the Foreign Slave Trade Abolition Bill in 1806, but that was actually his father – the cotton manufacturer and British MP.

Sir Robert would still have been a teenager at the time.

Campaigners have said Sir Robert’s family fortune was made off of the backs of slaves and he should no longer be honoured with a statue.

William Leverhulme

Lord William Leverhulme built one of Britain’s largest soap companies in the 1800s.

He made the first modern multinational business, and while he was known for caring for the welfare of his white workers, he exploited African slaves to make his fortune.

He set up palm oil plantations – the Lever plantations in the Congo – for forced labour.

Beatings and squalid conditions were the daily reality for most of the slaves.

The land was leased to him by his close friend King Leopold II long after slaver was officially ended in Britain.

A monument commemorates his philanthropy near Liverpool.

Elihu Yale

Protesters even want a Wetherspoons pub named after American-born Elihu Yale, a slave trader from the 17th century, changed.

Yale was the president of the East India Company settlement in Fort St George, at Madras.

He was  later booted from office after being charged with “self-aggrandisement” at company expense.

He was forced to pay a fine, but Yale was still able to take a massive fortune back with him to England.

In London he entered the diamond trade, but he devoted a good deal of his time and money to philanthropy.

Protesters said: “He enforced a law that at least ten slaves should be carried on every ship bound for Europe.

“In his capacity as judge he also on several occasions sentenced so-called “black criminals” to whipping and enslavement.”

After a petition in 2017 the pub sign was removed, which showed Yale alongside a slave in chains.

But the protesters want the pub to change the name entirely.

The management is saying that they are now “considering a name change”.

Captain Cook

A statue of explorer James Cook sits in Great Ayton.

Captain Cook was famous for discovering and colonising Australia and New Zealand.

Captain Cook’s “discovery” led to the deaths of Maori people in New Zealand and indigenous Australians.

Robert the Bruce

 The Robert the Bruce memorial in Bannockburn has also been defaced

The Robert the Bruce memorial in Bannockburn has also been defacedCredit: SWNS:South West News Service
The monument to the former Scottish king was vandalised on June 12, this year at Bannockburn.

Both the statue and the visitor centre were daubed with graffiti.

There is no known racist history associated with Robert the Bruce.

Some suggestions were made online that historical tensions between Scotland and England led to the racism accusations in the graffiti.

Sir Walter Raleigh Gilbert

The Bodmin Beacon memorial, erected in 1856, commemorates the service of Sir Walter Raleigh Gilbert in India.

Sir Walter was an army in the British East India Company.

Protesters said: “In 1849 he lead a division of East India Company soldiers responsible for killing 6000 Sikhs during the Second Anglo-Sikh War.”

Francis Galton

A lecture theatre at University College London is named after Francis Galton.

Galton has been called the father of eugenics and wanted to build a “improved human race”.

He coined the term Eugenics himself.

Galton wrote nine books and 200 papers in his life time about dozens of subjects including the use of fingerprints for personal identification, the correlational calculus (a branch of applied statistics), criminality, blood transfusions and meteorology.

He was knighted in 1909.

Full list of statues to be removed

James George Smith Neill – Monument – Ayr, Wellington Square

Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde – Statue – Glasgow, George Square

Sir Robert Peel – Statue – Glasgow, George Square

Henry Dundas – Statue – Edinburgh, St Andrew’s Square

Grey’s Monument – Newcastle Upon Tyne, Grainger Street

William Armstrong – Memorial – Newcastle Upon Tyne, Eldon Place

Statue of Sir Robert Peel in George Square,  Glasgow

Sir Robert Peel – Statue – Leeds, Woodhouse Moor

Robert Peel – Statue – Preston, Winkley Square

Robert Peel – Statue – Bury

Robert Peel – Statue – Manchester, Piccadilly Gardens

Oliver Cromwell – Statue – Manchester, Wythenshawe Road

Oliver Cromwell – Statue – Warrington, Bridge Street

Bryan Blundell – Blundell House – Liverpool, Liverpool Blue Coat School

Christopher Columbus – Statue – Liverpool, Sefton Park Palm House

William Leverhulme – Statue – Wirral, outside Lady Lever Art Gallery

Henry Morton Stanley – Statue – Denbigh, Hall Square

William Gladstone – Statue – Hawarden, Gladstone’s Library, Church Lane

Elihu Yale – Wetherspoons Pub – Wrexham, Regent Street

Black man’s head caricature – Ashbourne, Green Man

Robert Clive – Statue – Shrewsbury, The Square

Robert Peel – Statue – Tamworth, 27 Market Street

H Morton Stanley – Park – Redditch, Morton Stanley Park

Statue of Oliver Cromwell on Bridge Street, Warrington

Oliver Cromwell – Statue – St Ives, Market Hill

Ronald A. Fisher – Memorial – Cambridge, Gonville and Caius College

Sir Thomas Picton – Memorial – Carmarthen, Picton Terrace

General Nott – Statue – Carmarthen, Nott Square

Thomas Phillips – Memorial plaque – Brecon, Captain’s Walk

Cecil Rhodes – Statue – Oxford, Oriel College

Christopher Codrington – Rename Library – Oxford, Codrington Library, All Souls College

Rename Rhodes Arts Complex and Rhodes Avenue – Bishop’s Stortford, Cecil Rhodes

Sir Thomas Picton – Statue – Cardiff, Cardiff City Hall

Edward Colston – Rename Colston Hall and Colston Street – Bristol, Colston Street

Henry Overton Wills III – Wills Memorial Building – Bristol, University of Bristol

Edward Colston – Statue – Bristol, Bristol Harbour

Edward Colston – Building – Bristol, Colston Tower, Colston Street

Captain Edward August Lendy & Captain Charles Frederick Lendy – Memorial Statue – Sunbury-on-Thames, Pantiles Court

Edward Colston – Rename Colston Road – Mortlake, Colston Road

William Beckford – School – London, Dornfell Street

Robert the Bruce – Bannockburn

Statue of Robert Clive in The Square, Shrewsbury

Robert Geffrye – Statue located on the Museum of the Home – London, Kingsland Road

Francis Galton – Galton Lecture Theatre – London, Gower Street

Charles II of England – Statue – London, Soho Square Gardens

King James II – Statue – London, Trafalgar Square

Robert Clive – Statue – London, Westminster, King Charles Street

Oliver Cromwell – Statue – London, Houses of Parliament

Sir Robert Clayton – Statue – London, St Thomas’ Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road

Sir Henry De la Beche – Name on front of Imperial College – London, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus

Christopher Columbus – Monument – London, Belgrave Square Garden

Thomas Guy – Statue – London, Guys Hospital

Thomas Guy – London, Guy’s Hospital

Robert Milligan – Statue – London, Tower Hamlets, West India Quay

Sir Francis Drake, Robert Blake, Horatio Nelson – Statues – London, Deptford Town Hall, Goldsmiths College

Sir Francis Drake, Robert Blake and Horatio Nelson – Statues – London, Goldsmiths Uni Deptford Town Hall

Statue of Sir Robert Clayton on Westminster Bridge Road, London

Lord Kitchener – Statue – Chatham, Khartoum Road

Admiral Sir Edward Codrington – Plaque – Brighton, Western Road

William Ewart Gladstone – Plaque – Brighton, Royal Albion Hotel

Redvers Buller – Statue – Exeter, Hele Road

Francis Drake – Statue – Tavistock, Drakes Roundabout

Nancy Astor – Statue – Plymouth, Hoe Park

Francis Drake – Statue – Plymouth, Plymouth Hoe

‘A more diverse London’

The news comes after London Mayor Sadiq Khan demanded statues and plaques be removed and street names in London changed if they commemorate slave owners.

Mr Khan told Sky News on June 9: “We’ve got to realise that our public realm statues, squares, street names don’t accurately reflect our values, or London, in 2020.”

But he added: “I don’t condone at all any attacks on our police, any disorder or criminal damages.”

Meanwhile, it has been announced 130 Labour councils across England and Wales will begin reviewing monuments and statues in their towns and cities.

It means dozens more monuments could be removed.

A statement posted on Twitter said: “LGA Labour have consulted with all Labour council leaders, and there is overwhelming agreement from all Labour councils that they will listen to and work with their local communities to review the appropriateness of local monuments and statues on public land and council property.”

 Statue of Robert Dundas Viscount Melville, the son of Henry Dundas, is targeted in Edinburgh

Statue of Robert Dundas Viscount Melville, the son of Henry Dundas, is targeted in EdinburghCredit: Alamy Live News
And in Scotland, Adam McVey, leader of Edinburgh city council, told BBC Radio Scotland he would feel “absolutely no sense of loss” if the statue of Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville, responsible for delaying the abolition of the slave trade by 15 years, was removed from the 150ft Melville Monument.

On June 9 a statue of Robert Milligan – thought to have owned some 500 slaves – was removed from the West India Quay in East London following a petition from a Labour MP.

Milligan was the driving force behind the building of the West India Docks in London.

Reports say the statue’s removal was met with cheers and applause from onlookers.

Milligan’s statue had stood outside the Museum of the Docklands near the West India Quay he helped create near Canary Wharf.

Full list of statues to be removed

London, England: Colin Campbell (Field Marshal Lord Clyde)

Waterloo Place, near Piccadilly,

Chester: Statue of Stapleton Cotton

London: Evelyn Baring, 1st Baron Howick of Glendale

38 Wimpole St, W1G 8SF

London: William Gladstone

Bromley High St., Bow, E3 2SH

Oxford: Rhodes House

South Parks Road, OX1 3RG

Lisburn: John Nicholson statue

Lisburn Museum, Market Square, bt28 1ag

East Grinstead: Samuel Jeffries Church plaque

St Swithun’s Church, RH19

Chester: Statue of Viscount Combermere

Alness: Fyrish Monument

Highlands of Scotland, IV17 0XJ

Bristol: Henry Overton Wills III

Wills Hall, Parrys Lane, Bs91ae

London: Statue of John Cass

31 Jewry Street

Hammersmith : Crisp Road

Crisp Road

Broadstairs : Uncle Mack’s Plaque

Victoria Parade,

London: Colston Road

Colston Road

London: Lord Kitchener statue

South side of Horse Guards Parade

Croydon: East India Company Addiscombe Military Seminary

Corner of Clyde Road and A232, CR0 0XT

London: Cass Business School

106 Bunhill Row,

Haverfordwest : General Sir Thomas Picton (Gov)

Dragon House Hill Street,

London: Henry Bartle Frere statue

Llanfairpwllgwyngyll: Horatio Nelson Memorial Statue

Menai Strait

Argyll & Bute: Macquarie Musem and Mausoleum

Gruline, Isle of Mull,

St Asaph : H M Stanley Obelisk

Shrewsbury : Sir Clive of India

Mardol Head,

Whitby: Captain Cook Statue, Whitby

London: Bust of Alfred Beit, Royal School of Mines, Prince Consort Road, Imperial College London,

London: Sir John Cass, Guildhall Old Library

Dundee: George Kinloch Statue

Albert Square, DD1 1DA

London : Beit Quad, 2 Prince Consort Rd, Kensington, , SW7 2BB

Southrepps, Tony Dailide

Southrepps, Norfolk. , NR11

Middlesbrough: The Resolution

19 Newport Crescent, TS1 5UA

Middlesbrough: James Cook University Hospital

Marton Road, TS4 3BW

Liverpool : Christopher Columbus statue

Sefton Park Palm House, L17 1AP

Middlesbrough: Captain Cook Primary School

Stokesley Rd,

Middlesbrough: Captain Cook’s Crescent

Captain Cook’s Crescent,

St Asaph: Stanley obelisk st Asaph

High Street,

Cardiff: Thomas Picton Statue

City Hall, King Edward VII Avenue,

Great Yarmouth: Nelson Monument, Great Yarmouth

Fenner Road,

London: Statue of William Beckford in the Guildhall

The Guildhall ,

Retford: The Black Boy pub sign

14 Moorgate ,

London : Captain Cook Statue

The Mall, Westminster, SW1A 2WH

Liverpool: Tarleton Street Liverpool

1 Tarleton Street, L1 1DF

Norwich: Lord Nelson Statue

Swansea : de la Beche Street and de la Beche Road

de la Beche Street, , SA1 3EU

Bristol: Merchant Venturers Building

75 Woodland Road, Bs8 1ub

Comrie : Melville Monument, Comrie, Perthshire.

Dunmore Hill, PH6 2LX

Sunderland: Henry Havelock Statue

Mowbray Park, SR1 1QB

Saint Asaph: Henry Morton Stanley

Lower Street, LL17 0SG

London: Equestrian statue of the Viscount Wolseley

13 Macclesfield St, Westminster, W1D 5BR

London: William Beckford, Guildhall

Basinghall St, EC2V 7HH

Dunoon, Argyllshire: “Jim Crow” Rock

opp 165 Marine Parade, Hunter’s Quay, Dunoon, Argyllshire. 55.966794, -4.908494, PA23 8HJ

Hampstead: William Lever Blue Plaque

Inverforth House, North End Way, , NW3 7EU

Exmouth : Sir John Colleton

Outside library on Essex Road, EX8 1PS

Edinburgh: Earl of Hopetoun Statue

35 St Andrew Square, EH2 2AD

London : Nelson’s Column

A400 Trafalgar Square, London, United Kingdom, SW1Y 5BJ

Bury: Peel Tower

Holcombe Hill, off Moorbottom Road, BL8 4NR

London: Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive

King Charles Walk, Whitehall, SW19

Bristol : Colston Girls School

Cheltenham Rd, Montpelier, BS6 5RD

Golspie: Duke of Sutherland Monument

Ben Bhraggie, KW10 6UE

Lyme Regis: Statue of Admiral Sir George Somers

Langmore and Lister gardens, DT7 3JQ

Glasgow: Lord Roberts Monument

Kelvingrove Park, G3 6DL

bradford: Peel Park

Cliffe Rd, Bradford BD3 0LT, BD3 0LT

Glasgow: Frederick Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts statue

Kelvingrove Park, G3 6DL

Liverpool: Nelson Monument, Liverpool

Exchange Flags, L23PF

Liverpool: Martin’s Bank Slavery Relief

4 Waters Street, L23SP

Bodmin: Bodmin Beacon

PL31 1BH

Cardiff: Statue of Henry Austin Bruce, Lord of Aberdare

Alexandra Gardens, Cathays Park, Cf103nb

Orkney: The Kitchener memorial

B9056, Orkney , KW17 2ND

Ayr: James George Smith Neill Statue

Wellington Square, Ka7 1EN

Croydon : The East India estate

Elgin Road, havelock Road, Clyde Road, outram Road, canning road, Cr0 6xa

London: Horniman Museum

Forest Hill, SE23 3PQ

Wareham: Drax Avenue

Drax Avenue, BH20

London: Guy’s Hospital

Guy’s Hospital, Great Maze Pond, SE1 9RT

St Asaph: H M Stanley column/memorial

Lower Street, LL17 0SG

London: William Beckford (1709–1770)

Basinghall St, London , EC2V 7HH

Glasgow: Thomas Carlyle Statue

Kelvingrove Park, G3 6BY

Glasgow: Lord Roberts Monument

Kelvingrove Park, G3 6DL

Poole: Robert Baden-Powell

The Quay, BH15 1HJ

Bristol : Colston’s School

Bell Hill, Stapleton, , BS16 1BJ

Glasgow: John Moore statue

George Square, G1

Bradford : Robert Peel Statue

Peel Park, BD2 4BX

Great Ayton: Captain James Cook

TS96NE

London: Jan Smuts statue

Parliament square, SW1P 3JX

Birmingham: Robert Peel statue – Edgbaston

275 Pershore Road, B5 7RW

London: Henry Havelock

Trafalgar Square, WC2N 5DX

London: Statue of Charles James Napier

Trafalgar Square, WC2N 5DX

Bristol: Wills Memorial Building

University of Bristol, Queens Rd, BS8 1QE

London : Statue of Robert Clayton

Westminster Bridge Rd, Bishop’s, , SE1 7EH

Wrexham: ELIHU YALE Wetherspoons Pub

44-46 Regent Street, LL11 1RR

London: Robert Geffrye

The Museum of the Home, Kingsland Road, E2 8EA

London : Statue of Thomas Guy

Guys Hospital, SE1 1XJ

Bishop’s Stortford: Rhodes Arts Complex

1-3 South Street, CM23 3JG

Carmarthen : Statue of General Nott in Nott Square, Carmarthen

Nott Square, SA31 1PQ

Bury: Robert Peel Statue

HPV2+FR Bury, United Kingdom, BL9 0LA

London: Christopher Columbus

Belgrave Square Garden, Belgravia, London, SW1X 8PQ

Ayr: Monument to James Georg Smith Neill

Wellington Square, KA7 9SF

Preston : Robert Peel

Winkley Square, PR1 3JD

Statue of Robert Peel

Wirral : The Leverhulme Memorial

Outside Lady Lever Art Gallery, CH62 5EQ

London: Sir Robert Clayton statue

St Thomas’ Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH

Brighton: Blue Plaque to Admiral Sir Edward Codrington

140 Western Road, BN1 2LA

Chatham: Lord Kitchener

Khartoum road, ME4 4UB

Leeds: Robert Peel

Woodhouse Moor, LS6 1AQ

Cambridge: Ronald A. Fisher Memorial Window

Gonville and Caius College, CB2 1TA

Bristol: Colston Tower

Colston Tower, Colston Street, BS1 5AQ

Tamworth: Robert Peel Statue – Tamworth

27 Market St, B79 7LR

Leeds: Robert Peel Statue – Leeds

Woodhouse Moor, LS6 1AQ

Woodhouse, Leeds: Statue of Sir Robert Peel

1 Moor View, LS6 1AQ

Leeds: Sir Robert Peel

Woodhouse Moor, LS61AQ

Sunbury-on-Thames: The Lendy Memorial Lion

Pantiles Court, 79 St The Walled Garden Thames, Thames St, TW16 6AB

Oxford : Codrington Library

All Souls College, OX1 4AL

London: Beckford School

Dornfell St, West Hampstead, , NW6 1QL

Glasgow: Sir Robert Peel

George Square, G2 1DU

London: Goldsmiths Uni ‘Deptford Town Hall’ building statues

Goldsmiths Deptford Town Hall, SE14 6AF

Hawarden: William Gladstone statue

Gladstone’s Library, Church Lane, CH5 3DF

Brecon: Thomas Phillips

Captain’s Walk,

Oxford: Codrington Library, All Souls College

All Souls College,

Bristol: Edward Colston

Bristol Harbour, BS1 4SB

London : Statue of Robert Clive, Whitehall

King Charles St, Westminster, SW1A 2AQ

London : Sir Henry De la Beche – name on front of Imperial College (old Royal School of Mines)

London: Galton Lecture Theatre, UCL

Bristol: Colston Hall, Colston Street, Bristol Colston Street

Exeter: Redvers Buller

Hele Road

Glasgow: Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde George Square Glasgow

Plymouth: Nancy Astor – prominent Nazi supporter Hoe Park

Carmarthen: Picton Memorial Picton Terrace,

Tavistock: Statue of Francis Drake

Mortlake: Rename Colston Road in Mortlake

Liverpool: Rename Blundell House and stop glorifying Bryan Blundell

Liverpool Blue Coat School,

Bishop’s Stortford: Rename Rhodes Arts Complex and Rhodes Avenue

Plymouth: Francis Drake

Denbigh: H M Stanley

Hall Sq,

Edinburgh: Henry Dundas

St Andrew’s Square,

Tower Hamlets, London: Robert Milligan

West India Quay,

Shrewsbury, Shropshire: Robert Clive

Manchester: Robert Peel, Picadilly Gardens

Ashbourne: Black man’s head caricature, Green Man

Oxford: Cecil Rhodes

SOURCE

RELATED:

In 2019, What Should We Do with Sir John A. Macdonald Statue?

Real change must accompany removal of statues, street names linked to slavery, scholars say

Analysis: Toppling racist statues makes space for radical change

 

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