Government consultation shows parents overwhelmingly reject class size increase: sources

Image result for ontario class sizeOntario Class Size Changes Will Cut 10,000 Teachers’ Jobs In 5 Years: Watchdog

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Global News has learned parents that took part in the province’s education consultations overwhelmingly rejected an increase in class sizes.

According to sources with knowledge of the survey results, approximately 70 per cent of parents felt an increase in class sizes would negatively impact students’ learning. Global News has also learned the results show a majority of parents were opposed to the government moving towards more e-learning for students.

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“I think it shows that parents know what’s good for their kids, and they know a significant increase in class size, especially for kids that are struggling, will make it very difficult to learn,” a source not authorized to speak publicly told Global News on Saturday.

The Ministry of Education has withheld the results of the survey despite multiple attempts by numerous groups to gain access to the information.

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In September, Global News reported the ministry had blocked a freedom-of-information request from advocacy groups, including Ontario Families for Public Education.

When contacted Friday for comment on the results of the class size survey, Education Minister Stephen Lecce’s office refused to provide a clear answer as to why the critical information continues to be withheld.

Sources with the ministry, who are not authorized to speak publicly, say the survey was conducted when the government planned to move forward increasing the average class size ratio in grades 9-12 from 22:1 to 28:1 and that there is a “sky-is-falling” narrative by certain voices. In October Lecce announced the government had tabled an offer to the high school teacher’s union to reduce that ratio to 25:1.

In September, Global News reported the ministry had blocked a freedom-of-information request from advocacy groups, including Ontario Families for Public Education.

When contacted Friday for comment on the results of the class size survey, Education Minister Stephen Lecce’s office refused to provide a clear answer as to why the critical information continues to be withheld.

Sources with the ministry, who are not authorized to speak publicly, say the survey was conducted when the government planned to move forward increasing the average class size ratio in grades 9-12 from 22:1 to 28:1 and that there is a “sky-is-falling” narrative by certain voices. In October Lecce announced the government had tabled an offer to the high school teacher’s union to reduce that ratio to 25:1.

In September, Global News reported the ministry had blocked a freedom-of-information request from advocacy groups, including Ontario Families for Public Education.

When contacted Friday for comment on the results of the class size survey, Education Minister Stephen Lecce’s office refused to provide a clear answer as to why the critical information continues to be withheld.

Sources with the ministry, who are not authorized to speak publicly, say the survey was conducted when the government planned to move forward increasing the average class size ratio in grades 9-12 from 22:1 to 28:1 and that there is a “sky-is-falling” narrative by certain voices. In October Lecce announced the government had tabled an offer to the high school teacher’s union to reduce that ratio to 25:1.

In September, Global News reported the ministry had blocked a freedom-of-information request from advocacy groups, including Ontario Families for Public Education.

When contacted Friday for comment on the results of the class size survey, Education Minister Stephen Lecce’s office refused to provide a clear answer as to why the critical information continues to be withheld.

Sources with the ministry, who are not authorized to speak publicly, say the survey was conducted when the government planned to move forward increasing the average class size ratio in grades 9-12 from 22:1 to 28:1 and that there is a “sky-is-falling” narrative by certain voices. In October Lecce announced the government had tabled an offer to the high school teacher’s union to reduce that ratio to 25:1.

In September, Global News reported the ministry had blocked a freedom-of-information request from advocacy groups, including Ontario Families for Public Education.

When contacted Friday for comment on the results of the class size survey, Education Minister Stephen Lecce’s office refused to provide a clear answer as to why the critical information continues to be withheld.

Sources with the ministry, who are not authorized to speak publicly, say the survey was conducted when the government planned to move forward increasing the average class size ratio in grades 9-12 from 22:1 to 28:1 and that there is a “sky-is-falling” narrative by certain voices. In October Lecce announced the government had tabled an offer to the high school teacher’s union to reduce that ratio to 25:

In September, Global News reported the ministry had blocked a freedom-of-information request from advocacy groups, including Ontario Families for Public Education.

When contacted Friday for comment on the results of the class size survey, Education Minister Stephen Lecce’s office refused to provide a clear answer as to why the critical information continues to be withheld.

Sources with the ministry, who are not authorized to speak publicly, say the survey was conducted when the government planned to move forward increasing the average class size ratio in grades 9-12 from 22:1 to 28:1 and that there is a “sky-is-falling” narrative by certain voices. In October Lecce announced the government had tabled an offer to the high school teacher’s union to reduce that ratio to 25:1.

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