Council of Canadians: The Pact for a Green New Deal

“The Pact for a Green New Deal is a growing movement of people across Canada who understand that governments are not doing enough to solve the climate crisis – and we hope you will be a part of it.” – Council of Canadians

A plan to shift Canada’s entire economy to battle climate change has been launched in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal. The proposed Green New Deal is being endorsed by David Suzuki and 60 signatories — including the largest unions, by youth leaders, by Indigenous groups and by environmental economists.
A plan to shift Canada’s entire economy to battle climate change has been launched in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal. The proposed Green New Deal is being endorsed by David Suzuki and 60 signatories — including the largest unions, by youth leaders, by Indigenous groups and by environmental economists.  (ROBERT F. BUKATY / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)

We are living in a global climate crisis. Scientists have given us just 11 years to cut our emissions in half in order to avoid catastrophic impacts and the crisis moving beyond our control. To do that, we must see “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society.”

The Pact for a Green New Deal is a growing movement of people across Canada who understand that governments are not doing enough to solve the climate crisis – and we hope you will be a part of it.

The Pact for a Green New Deal calls for rapid, inclusive and far-reaching just transition led by the federal government, to slash emissions, meet the demands of the multiple crises we face, respect the rights of Indigenous peoples, and create over 1 million jobs in the process. It is a proposal that is gaining in popularity among people and groups from all walks of life, especially young people who know their futures are at stake.

It means making all our communities healthier. It means reconnecting and feeling safe again. It means all of society heeding the call from young people, and coming together to avert disaster, planning not just how to sustain this generation, but the seven that come after it. A Green New Deal in Canada must lift us all, together.

Inspired by Québec’s Le Pacte pour une transition and the Green New Deal campaign Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is championing in the U.S., the Council of Canadians has joined with progressive groups, organizations and people from coast-to-coast-to-coast in calling for a Green New Deal in Canada to meet the demands of justice and the climate crisis.

A Green New Deal rests on two fundamental principles:

  • It must be based on Indigenous knowledge and science and cut Canada’s emissions in half in 11 years.
  • It must leave no one behind and create a better present and future for all of us.

Join the call for a Green New Deal

Mark your calendar! Green New Deal Town Halls

From May 20 to 26, 2019, you can join the national conversation to define what a Green New Deal for Canada will look like. Stay tuned for dates and locations where you can join workers, Indigenous peoples, students, trade unions, migrants, community organizations and people across the country to gather, define and design a plan for a safe future and more prosperous present. We will discuss how a Green New Deal can help our families, communities, and regions thrive. We will invite our MPs and local candidates for October’s federal election to sit and listen in.

SOURCE

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to Rally for Green New Deal in Washington

 


Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez during a news conference on the Green New Deal in February.Credit: Pete Marovich for The New York Times

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the popular freshman Democrat from New York who is trying to use her star power to move the Democratic Party to the left, will headline a rally next week in Washington in favor of the Green New Deal, as she seeks to shore up support for the expansive climate legislation that has been met with skepticism by members of both parties.

Ms. Ocasio-Cortez, a co-sponsor of the Green New Deal, has long aligned herself with Sunrise Movement, the collection of young, hard-charging activists who are pressuring Democrats nationwide to take bolder actions to address climate change after years of what they see as an inadequate response.

The May 13 rally at Howard University, the final stop on the group’s nationwide “Green New Deal Tour,” will make the case for the bill in the backyard of Capitol Hill, where party establishment figures such as Nancy Pelosi, the House speaker, and Chuck Schumer, the Senate minority leader, have been more wary of their party’s progressive flank than many in their rank-and-file.

“From fire-scarred California to areas of the plains devastated by flooding, people are hungry for a big vision to transform our economy in line with science and justice demands,” said Varshini Prakash, a co-founder of Sunrise Movement. “I’m thrilled to be joining Representative Ocasio-Cortez to close out the tour and lay out what’s next in the Green New Deal campaign.” MORE

 

Children Change Their Parents’ Minds about Climate Change

Children are leading the fight to address the climate emergency. Are you listening? Is your Member of Parliament listening?

Study of students schooled on the issue showed them going on to shift their elders’ attitudes

Children Change Their Parents' Minds about Climate Change
Swedish environmental campaigner Greta Thunberg addresses politicians, media and guests with the British Houses of Parliament on April 23, 2019 in London, England. Her visit coincides with the ongoing “Extinction Rebellion” protests across London, which have seen days of disruption to roads and transport systems, in a bid to highlight the dangers of climate change. Credit: Leon Neal Getty Images

Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg became famous this spring for launching a student movement to compel adults to take action on climate change. Instead of going to school, Greta has been spending her Fridays in front of the Swedish parliament with a sign reading: “School Strike for Climate.” Students in more than 70 countries have since followed her lead. But before she started trying to convince the world to take action, Thunberg worked on her parents. She showered them with facts and showed them documentaries. “After a while, they started listening to what I actually said,” Thunberg told the Guardiannewspaper. “That’s when I realized I could make a difference.”

Thunberg is not alone. Other young people can be equally convincing, according to a paper published May 6 in Nature Climate Change. The team of social scientists and ecologists from North Carolina State University who authored the report found that children can increase their parents’ level of concern about climate change because, unlike adults, their views on the issue do not generally reflect any entrenched political ideology. Parents also really do care what their children think, even on socially charged issues like climate change or sexual orientation.

Postulating that pupils might be ideal influencers, the researchers decided to test how 10-to-14–year-olds’ exposure to climate change coursework might affect, not only the youngsters’ views, but those of their parents. The proposed pass-through effect turned out to be true: teaching a child about the warming climate often raised concerns among parents about the issue. Fathers and conservative parents showed the biggest change in attitudes, and daughters were more effective than sons in shifting their parents’ views. The results suggest that conversations between generations may be an effective starting point in combating the effects of a warming environment. “This model of intergenerational learning provides a dual benefit,” says graduate student Danielle Lawson, the paper’s lead author. “[It prepares] kids for the future since they’re going to deal with the brunt of climate change’s impact. And it empowers them to help make a difference on the issue now by providing them a structure to have conversations with older generations to bring us together to work on climate change.” MORE

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This credit card won’t let you buy anything else after you’ve hit your annual carbon limit

What you purchase matters: your purchase  either is life-affirming or it helps to trash the planet. Consumer accountability is a powerful incentive for individuals to take ownership of their role in adding to the climate emergency.

The Do Black card is a radical solution to expanding carbon footprints.

When you use a new credit card, it will eventually cut you off—not because you’ve reached a financial limit but because your purchases have tipped you over your carbon limit for the year.

“We realized that putting a limit that blocks your ability to complete the transaction is radical . . . but it’s the clearest way to illustrate the severity of the situation we’re in,” says Johan Pihl, one of the founders of Doconomy, a Sweden-based think tank that is launching the new card in collaboration with the UN Climate Change Secretariat and Mastercard. “We need to address how our consumption is impacting our planet.”

Doconomy is launching two versions of the card later this year. One just tracks your carbon footprint as you spend, and the other, called Do Black, takes the additional step of setting a hard limit on your footprint for the year. Initially, the data used to calculate the impact of each purchase will be imprecise—the system pulls the category code of a merchant that classifies it as a particular kind of store, then makes a calculation based on the general carbon footprint of the industry, whether you’re buying something from a fast-food joint, a clothing store, or an airline. The limit is based on a country-specific calculation of how much carbon each citizen can emit to stay on track with the 2030 goal to cut emissions in half.

[Image: courtesy Doconomy]

In the future, the calculation of impact will be tied to specific line items on a receipt to make it more accurate. Others are working on similar solutions; a startup nonprofit called Poseidon Foundation is beginning to work with retailers to track the impact of specific purchases and let customers instantly buy a carbon offset equal to their emissions. Ben and Jerry’s tested the concept at an ice cream shop in London last year. MORE

Green Party win in B.C. shows climate issues could impact October

Canadians are serious about climate change, something that has largely escaped neoliberal parties. Perhaps this is a turning point.

Newly elected Paul Manly expects support to grow ahead of federal election

Green Party supporters hope Paul Manly’s byelection win signifies the clout which climate issues will carry in October’s federal election. (Chad Hipolito/Canadian Press)

British Columbia voters sent a message that Canadians are deeply concerned about the environment and climate issues will be at the forefront in October’s federal election campaign, jubilant Green Party supporters said Monday night.

Voters in Nanaimo elected Paul Manly of the Greens as their new member of Parliament, barely six months before October’s federal vote.

With 96 per cent of polls reporting in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection, Manly received 37.1 per cent of the vote.

John Hirst, the Conservative candidate, was a distant second with 25.1 per cent of the vote. The NDP polled 22.9 per cent and Liberal candidate Michelle Corfield received 11.1 per cent of the vote.

“People really want to see action on climate change,” said Manly, who called his victory “historic.”
British Columbia voters sent a message that Canadians are deeply concerned about the environment and climate issues will be at the forefront in October’s federal election campaign, jubilant Green Party supporters said Monday night.

Voters in Nanaimo elected Paul Manly of the Greens as their new member of Parliament, barely six months before October’s federal vote.

Green Party wins federal byelection in Nanaimo-Ladysmith
With 96 per cent of polls reporting in the Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection, Manly received 37.1 per cent of the vote.

John Hirst, the Conservative candidate, was a distant second with 25.1 per cent of the vote. The NDP polled 22.9 per cent and Liberal candidate Michelle Corfield received 11.1 per cent of the vote.

“People really want to see action on climate change,” said Manly, who called his victory “historic.”

Manly will become the second Green Party member in Parliament, joining Leader Elizabeth May.

His victory shows the other parties that Canadians are serious about climate change, Manly said, adding he expects the Green wave of support to grow in the October election. MORE

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