Wet’suwet’en hereditary leaders level human rights complaint during speeches at United Nations forum

 

Hereditary leaders speak at the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York


Members of the RCMP move in to enforce an injunction against Wet’suwet’en people and their supporters on a forest service road in the nation’s traditional territory in northern B.C. on Jan. 7, 2019. (Chantelle Bellrichard/CBC)

Hereditary leaders from the Wet’suwet’en Nation in northern B.C. told the United Nations special rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous Peoples Wednesday their human rights are being violated by pipeline development on their territory.

Hereditary chief Na’moks and FredaHuson, longtime spokesperson and resident at the Unist’ot’en camp in Wet’suwet’en territory, made statements to the special rapporteur at the meeting of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York.

They expressed concern over how tensions between their leadership, Canadian institutions and industry have been playing out in recent years, asking for the UN to take specific action.

“We are troubled by the ongoing trend in Canada that the interests of corporations for natural resource extraction are superseding the rights of Indigenous people on our lands and territories,” Na’moks told the rapporteur.

Hereditary leaders from the Wet’suwet’en Nation in northern B.C. told the United Nations special rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous Peoples Wednesday their human rights are being violated by pipeline development on their territory.

Hereditary chief Na’moks and Freda Huson, longtime spokesperson and resident at the Unist’ot’en camp in Wet’suwet’en territory, made statements to the special rapporteur at the meeting of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York.

They expressed concern over how tensions between their leadership, Canadian institutions and industry have been playing out in recent years, asking for the UN to take specific action.

“We are troubled by the ongoing trend in Canada that the interests of corporations for natural resource extraction are superseding the rights of Indigenous people on our lands and territories,” Na’moks told the rapporteur.

The Wet’suwet’en hereditary leadership has long maintained it does not consent to pipelines being built through the traditional territory.

Watch the video HERE

Na’moks asked the UN to emphasize to Canada the need to fully implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and that states need to recognize the human right of people to peacefully express dissent to activity in their territories without being criminalized. MORE

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s