Obligation to deal with proper Wet’suwet’en title holders

If TransCanada doesn’t like it, they can go around Wet’suwet’en Territory

I am appalled at the government of B.C. regarding both its insistence on pressing forward with hydraulic fracturing at this time of climate crisis and with its clear choosing of offensive, disrespectful and contemptuous actions to the Wet’suwet’en Nation to accomplish this goal.

I strongly condemn the RCMP’s raid on Wet’suwet’en Nation, their forceful removal of land defenders from their territory and their continued occupation. The RCMP actions are in contravention of our governments’ commitments to reconciliation at all levels, in contravention of the Supreme Court of Canada’s repeated rulings on title and rights, in contravention of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People and in contravention of what is just decent and right.

Provincial and federal levels of government knew that the hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en are the title holders of that land. They had an obligation to inform TransCanada of this and to deal with the proper title holders of the land involved. If TransCanada doesn’t like it, they can go around Wet’suwet’en Territory or reinvest in some activity that might have a chance of getting us out of some of the many crises we currently face on our planet.

I am appalled at the government of B.C. regarding both its insistence on pressing forward with hydraulic fracturing at this time of climate crisis and with its clear choosing of offensive, disrespectful and contemptuous actions to the Wet’suwet’en Nation to accomplish this goal.

I strongly condemn the RCMP’s raid on Wet’suwet’en Nation, their forceful removal of land defenders from their territory and their continued occupation. The RCMP actions are in contravention of our governments’ commitments to reconciliation at all levels, in contravention of the Supreme Court of Canada’s repeated rulings on title and rights, in contravention of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People and in contravention of what is just decent and right.

Provincial and federal levels of government knew that the hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en are the title holders of that land. They had an obligation to inform TransCanada of this and to deal with the proper title holders of the land involved. If TransCanada doesn’t like it, they can go around Wet’suwet’en Territory or reinvest in some activity that might have a chance of getting us out of some of the many crises we currently face on our planet. MORE

Indian Act to blame for pipeline gridlock in northern B.C.: federal minister

Canada’s Indian Act blamed for creating a gridlock in northern British Columbia where some hereditary clan chiefs say a liquefied natural gas pipeline doesn’t have their consent.

 

VANCOUVER — Canada’s minister of Crown-Indigenous relations is pointing her finger at the Indian Act for creating a gridlock in northern British Columbia where some hereditary clan chiefs say a liquefied natural gas pipeline doesn’t have their consent.

Carolyn Bennett would not say whether she believes the hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation have jurisdiction over the 22,000 square kilometres they claim as their traditional territory, saying that it is up to each community to determine its leadership structure.

But she says the situation is an example of why the federal government is working to increase First Nations capacity for self-governance, including a new funding program to rebuild hereditary structures. MORE

Cities need to start making their own food

If we could shift food production to a more hyperlocal, circular system, both our planet and ourselves would be better off.


[Source Images: mawais/Blendswap (city), gg/Blendswap (crops)]

Even if you are someone who tries to eat healthy–buys only organic produce, and consumes only ethically raised meats–our food system is probably still jeopardizing your well-being.

Cities and Circular Economy for FoodThe way we eat now is so dependent on chemicals, carbon emissions, and waste buildup that its effects are becoming impossible to ignore. In a new report, Cities and Circular Economy for Food, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, a U.K.-based nonprofit dedicated to advancing more equitable and sustainable economies, calculates the damage of our current food system–and how we might build a better one.

In the report, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and Systemiq call for a total overhaul of the system. Rather than the current linear structure, in which food flows from large-scale industrial farms into cities, and the waste from that food then flows into landfill, the authors envision a circular system revolving around cities themselves. MORE

Make three eco-friendly cleaners in under 15 minutes

Mopping the kitchen floorMost of us are exposed to cleaning products and their residues every day. (Photo: rawpixel via Unsplash)

Canada doesn’t require warnings about hazards from chemicals in cleaning products. But most of us are exposed to these every day! So make your own. Discover the eco-friendly cleaning powers of castile soap and soap nuts. Both can be fair trade, not tested on animals and free of fragrance and petroleum. Learn how to shop for “green” cleaners, too.

How to use castille soap

All purpose scour and spray

How to make dish soap

How to shop for green cleaners

SOURCE

We asked Jagmeet Singh about his support for one pipeline and his opposition to another


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh was in full campaign mode on Sat. Jan. 19, as he got the backing of some star power in the middle of a byelection campaign in the Vancouver region.

Jagmeet Singh answers questions about why he expressed his support for the Coastal GasLink LNG pipeline, while he opposes the Trans Mountain oil pipeline and tanker expansion project. Singh was campaigning in Burnaby on Jan. 19, 2019. Video by Michael Ruffolo

 MORE

Trudeau’s oilsands supply outlook reflects a future that doesn’t exist


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks to reporters at a news conference in Ottawa on June 20, 2018. File photo by Alex Tétreault

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is relying on an aggressive and outdated Western Canadian crude oil supply outlook to re-approve Trans Mountain’s expansion. Trudeau’s outlook seriously contradicts the supply forecast oilsands producers support as commercially viable.

The outlook Trudeau is clinging to was prepared in early 2015 when Stephen Harper was still prime minister. It predicts that by 2035 there will be an increase in oilsands supply of more than two million barrels a day from its current level of three million barrels a day, taking total oilsands supply to five million barrels a day. Trudeau expects an increase in oilsands supply of almost 70 per cent in little more than 15 years. This is a future that no longer exists.

Ottawa seems not to have noticed that major multinationals have pulled out of the oilsands selling to mainly Canadian-based producers whose debt loads are too high to satisfy investors that it’s financially prudent for them to expand. Overpaying for reserves that are threatened to become stranded assets makes sophisticated investors skittish. MORE

Svend Robinson returns to politics with plans to tackle climate change, housing affordability and Big Pharma

Image result for Svend Robinson ndp
Svend Robinson spoke at his official nomination on Saturday. Robinson said climate change and the housing crisis were the two main reasons why he chose to re-enter politics. (CBC)

The Burnaby North—Seymour NDP Riding Association acclaimed former MP and veteran progressive Svend Robinson on Saturday as its candidate for the federal election.

Addressing a packed room of activists and constituents at the Confederation Seniors Centre in north Burnaby, Robinson, who represented various federal ridings in Burnaby from 1979 until 2004, said he was returning to public life to fight climate change and the housing affordability crisis.

“I am running to put climate change and global warming at the top of our political agenda, and to demand that we mobilize the same way we mobilize nationally to fight a war,” Robinson said. “It means we must listen to and respect the voices of indigenous leaders, both hereditary and elected councils.” MORE