Greta Thunberg: Our leaders are behaving like children

David Attenborough tells Davos: ‘The Garden of Eden is no more’

Human activity has created a new era yet climate change can be stopped, says naturalist

Sir David Attenborough has warned that “the Garden of Eden is no more”, as he urged political and business leaders from around the world to make a renewed push to tackle climate change before the damage is irreparable.

Speaking at the start of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, the 92-year-old naturalist and broadcaster warned that human activity has taken the world into a new era, threatening to undermine civilisation.

Recently voted Britain’s most trustworthy celebrity , Attenborough said humans must use their expert problem-solving skills. “If people can truly understand what is at stake, I believe they will give permission for business and governments to get on with the practical solutions,” he told the WEF. Get it right, he argued, and humans can create a world with clean air and water, unlimited energy and sustainable fish stocks, but only if decisive action is taken now. MORE

Indifference and disrespect are constants in the lives of Indigenous peoples

Covington High School student Nick Sandmann, left, and Omaha First Nation Elder Nathan Phillips at the Indigenous Peoples March in Washington D.C. on Jan. 18, 2019. The stomach-churning feeling of racism in the confrontation is palpable, Tanya Talaga writes.

Covington High School student Nick Sandmann, left, and Omaha First Nation Elder Nathan Phillips at the Indigenous Peoples March in Washington D.C. on Jan. 18, 2019. The stomach-churning feeling of racism in the confrontation is palpable, Tanya Talaga writes.  (HAYLEY HANKS / KC NOLAND/YOUTUBE)

THUNDER BAY—The debate over what exactly happened at last week’s Indigenous Peoples March misses the point. Whatever the order of events, First Nations people will see in the image of a white high school student confronting an Indigenous Elder in Washington, D.C. the callous indifference and disrespect that are constants of their experience.

This is certainly true of the Indigenous people of Thunder Bay, who learned this week that the man accused of throwing the trailer hitch that hit a First Nations woman would stand trial for second-degree murder.

This is the city that recently saw its police board disbanded while authorities reopen nine Indigenous death cases, four of those being the Seven Fallen Feathers — First Nations students Jethro Anderson, Curran Strang, Kyle Morrisseau and Jordan Wabasse — who died in this city between 2000 and 2011. All this after a sweeping provincial probe into systemic racism inside the Thunder Bay police force. MORE