World’s Largest Wind Turbine to Test Its Wings in Rotterdam

Image result for A prototype of GE's massive new wind turbine will be installed in the industrial area of Maasvlakte 2 in Rotterdam. GE Renewable Energy
A prototype of GE’s massive new wind turbine will be installed in the industrial area of Maasvlakte 2 in Rotterdam. GE Renewable Energy

Rotterdam’s skyline will soon feature the world’s largest and most powerful offshore wind turbine.

EcoWatch has written about this giant machine before. At 853-feet tall, it’s about three times the height of the Flatiron building in New York City. Its massive rotor diameter of 722 feet is roughly the tower height of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge above water.

It’s not only big, it’s incredibly powerful. On its own, a single Haliade-X can generate enough power to supply 16,000 European households, GE touts, adding that a 750-megawatt wind farm configuration could produce enough power for up to 1 million homes MORE.

What an early draft tells us about Canada’s new food guide

https://globalnews.ca/video/embed/4830846/

Canada’s new food guide, expected sometime early this year, already looks like it might be a big change from the old “food rainbow” design that hung in classrooms for years.

While the new guide has yet to be finalized, some clues about its contents can be found in an October 2018 report prepared by Earnscliffe Strategy Group in which the firm was asked to present various concepts and illustrations to focus groups to find out what Canadians think.

The most novel change is that it looks like the new food guide will also include advice on how to eat — rather than just what to eat.

“Healthy eating is more than the foods you eat,” reads a heading in an illustration meant to provide key concepts at a glance.

One of the images sent out to focus groups in a report about the new food guide prepared by Earnscliffe Strategy Group.

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How to Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

three white wind turbines miniatures on tables

Climate change can be overwhelming. The science is complex, and when it comes to future impacts, there are still a lot of unknowns. While real solutions will require action on a global scale, there are choices you can make in your day-to-day life to lessen your personal impact on the environment. This guide will walk you through some of them.

This is part of A Year of Living Better, a monthly series of how-to guides for subscribers that will help you improve your life, community and world.

What Is a Carbon Footprint?

 

A carbon footprint is the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions that come from the production, use and end-of-life of a product or service. It includes carbon dioxide — the gas most commonly emitted by humans — and others, including methane, nitrous oxide, and fluorinated gases, which trap heat in the atmosphere, causing global warming. Usually, the bulk of an individual’s carbon footprint will come from transportation, housing and food.  MORE

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A Year of Living Better

 

Food in the Anthropocene: the EAT–Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems

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Food systems have the potential to nurture human health and support environmental sustainability; however, they are currently threatening both. Providing a growing global population with healthy diets from sustainable food systems is an immediate challenge.
Although global food production of calories has kept pace with population growth, more than 820 million people have insufficient food and many more consume low-quality diets that cause micronutrient deficiencies and contribute to a substantial rise in the incidence of diet-related obesity and diet-related non-communicable diseases, including coronary heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.
Unhealthy diets pose a greater risk to morbidity and mortality than does unsafe sex, and alcohol, drug, and tobacco use combined. Because much of the world’s population is inadequately nourished and many environmental systems and processes are pushed beyond safe boundaries by food production, a global transformation of the food system is urgently needed. MORE
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A rift over indigenous representation in Canada is creating winners and losers


Protesters arrive in support of the Unist’ot’en camp and Wet’suwet’en First Nation in Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9. (Chad Hipolito/The Canadian Press, via AP)

Canadian governments tend to talk to the indigenous governments recognized by the Indian Act, which, since 1876, has required any “body of Indians” holding claim or trust to organize themselves through elected councils. Though politicians claim to find the Victorian paternalism of the Indian Act distasteful, the notion that aboriginal governments should conduct themselves democratically seemed among its least contentious provisions. Yet a recent jurisdictional struggle highlights the degree to which even that assumption can no longer be taken for granted.

The council of the Wet’suwet’en Nation has authorized construction of a natural gas pipeline through their claimed territory, but the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs have not. Forces loyal to the chiefs set up blockades and earlier this month mobilized outrage among indigenous Canadians and the Canadian left. The notion that elected aboriginal councils are colonial impositions at odds with “traditional governance structures” like hereditary monarchies has burst into the mainstream. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who theoretically backs natural resource development but also vows to make aboriginal “reconciliation” the hallmark of his tenure, has conceded to indigenous nations that “it’s not for the federal government to decide who speaks for you.”

Yet if the federal and provincial governments (to say nothing of private industry) are going to have any useful relationship with the true owners of British Columbia, at some point someone, somewhere, has to give the question of “who speaks for the aboriginals” a definitive answer. In some corners, even framing the question elicits offense. Canada’s First Nations are collectivist and egalitarian, they say, meaning community consent may emerge slowly, through gradual consensus between leaders and people. MORE