B.C.’s electoral reform vote fails

B.C.’s voting system will not change, Elections BC announced Thursday.

B.C.’s voting system will not change, Elections BC announced Thursday.

In the electoral reform referendum 61.3 per cent of voters voted to stay with B.C.’s current first-past-the-post electoral system, while 38.7 per cent of voters backed proportional representation.

A total of 1,403,358 votes were received, representing 42.6 per cent of registered voters, Elections BC said.

When the results are broken down by electoral district, it’s clear that Vancouverites and people on Vancouver Island supported proportional representation, while those in other areas of the province did not. For example, 74 per cent of ballots returned from Vancouver- Mount Pleasant were in favour of pro-rep. In the West End, 61 per cent were in favour and in Point Grey, 52 per cent were in favour. In most parts of Surrey, less than 30 per cent were in favour.   MORE

Vaughn Palmer: B.C. voters decide against Horgan’s ‘leap of faith’ as proportional representation bites the dust


Premier John Horgan and B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver following their speeches at a rally in support of proportional representation. CHAD HIPOLITO / THE CANADIAN PRESS

VICTORIA — Premier John Horgan tried to stack the referendum deck in favour of proportional representation, believing it would improve the chances of another term of “progressive” NDP government in partnership with the Greens. MORE

BC Says No to Proportional Representation

Some 61.3 per cent of voters opt for current electoral system.

Unlike past referenda on electoral reform, this one became partisan. The BC Liberals opposed the change while the NDP and Greens campaigned in favour. MORE

 

Illegal mining in the Amazon ‘not comparable to any other period of its history’

Democrats Just Blocked Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Push For A Green New Deal

Instead, Democrats are sticking to their original plan, and channeled Exxon Mobil in an announcement refusing to bar members who take fossil fuel money.

Democratic leaders on Thursday tapped Rep. Kathy Castor (D-Fla.) to head a revived U.S. House panel on climate change, all but ending a dramatic monthlong effort to establish a select committee on a Green New Deal.

Castor’s appointment came as a surprise to proponents of a Green New Deal. The move also kicked off a controversy as the six-term congresswoman dismissed calls to bar members who accept money from fossil fuel companies from serving on the committee, arguing it would violate free speech rights. MORE

 

Mounties wrap up vote today to select a new labour union

The RCMP are the only major non-unionized police force in Canada

Mounties are marking a historic moment today in their fight to unionize for the first time in the institution’s 145-year history. RCMP members have until noon today to vote on whether they want the National Police Federation to represent them, but it could be months yet before they learn the results.

The Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board is overseeing the union certification vote. It has said the results will be kept under wraps until it rules on whether Quebec Mounties should have their own union. MORE

 

Hunting guide files lawsuit against province over B.C. grizzly hunt ban

Proposed class-action lawsuit claims hunting ban harmed thousands of people, not based on science

The operator of a guide outfitting company has filed a proposed class-action lawsuit against the British Columbia government over the ban on grizzly bear hunting.

Ron Fleming, owner of Love Bros. & Lee, is seeking compensation for all B.C. guide outfitting businesses allegedly harmed by the hunting ban. MORE

 

Washington, D.C., to run entirely on renewable energy by 2032

Washington D.C. and capitol building skyline
Washington, D.C., lawmakers aren’t letting the federal government hold them back when it comes to embracing a greener, cleaner future. (Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Earlier this week, Washington, D.C.’s city council voted unanimously to pass landmark legislation — the impressively aggressive Clean Energy D.C. Omnibus Act of 2018 — that would see the nation’s capital run on 100 percent renewable energy by 2032.

Essentially this means that within 14 years, D.C.’s electric utilities will be required to procure their supply from zero-emissions energy sources like solar and wind power. In turn, all businesses, governmental institutions, museums, municipal operations and residences — yes, even the executive one — in the nation’s capital will be powered by fossil fuel-free sources. MORE

The fossil fuel era is coming to an end, but the lawsuits are just beginning

Mining company Westmoreland Coal, which purchased five coal mines in Alberta, is suing Canada for $470 million under NAFTA after the province legislated a phaseout of coal-fired power plants

“Coal is dead.”

These are not the words of a Greenpeace activist or left-wing politician, but of Jim Barry, the global head of the infrastructure investment group at Blackrock — the world’s largest asset manager. Barry made this statement in 2017, but the writing has been on the wall for longer than that.

Banks know it, which is why they are increasingly unwilling to underwrite new coal mines and power plants. Unions and coal workers know it, which is why they are demanding a just transition and new employment opportunities in the clean economy. Even large diversified mining companies are getting out of the business of coal. MORE

 

Fooling the People – Six months of Doug Ford

FordDoug Ford and the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario have been in power for almost six months now. 

We knew that Ford’s agenda for Ontario would be a dangerous step backwards, that he would undo many of the progressive policies we’ve fought hard for over many years, but even we are stunned by how aggressive and undemocratic the Progressive Conservatives have been so far—and it looks like they are just getting started.

SECRET AGENDA

Here are just a few of the major initiatives the PCO government has undertaken that they never said anything about during the election campaign: MORE

2nd camp set up to block pipeline company’s access to Wet’suwet’en land

B.C. judge granted a temporary injunction for access by Coastal GasLink on Friday


Freda Huson speaking to supporters outside the Prince George courthouse before a hearing last week regarding the injunction application made by Coastal GasLink. (Chantelle Bellrichard/CBC)

A second checkpoint has been put up on a remote B.C. forestry road to block construction of the Coastal GasLink pipeline, days after a court ordered that the first one must stop preventing the company from accessing the road and a bridge.

An interim injunction order from a B.C. court last Friday ordered the individuals at the Unist’ot’en camp, a self-described re-occupation of Wet’suwet’en land, to stop impeding Coastal GasLink from gaining access to the logging road and bridge it argues is on a critical path it needs to access as part of pipeline construction.

The pipeline is part of an estimated $40 billion natural gas project slated for construction in B.C. The nearly 700 km long pipeline is meant to transport natural gas from northeastern B.C. to a liquefied natural gas plant slated for construction in the north coast community of Kitimat.  MORE

 

Minister McKenna provides update on Canada’s climate change plan

Minister of the Environment Catherine McKenna introduced three updates to Canada’s climate plan on Thursday that includes new regulations for vehicle emissions standards, pricing for heavy corporate polluters, and clean energy incentives for small businesses, not-for-profits, and indigenous communities.
Image result for CANADA December 20 2018 10:47am Minister McKenna provides upClick on the picture to watch the video