McKenna’s global carbon market plan more charade than genuine climate action

At the conclusion of the United Nations COP24 climate talks in Katowice, Poland, federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna boasted that Canada “played a leading role in laying the groundwork for a global carbon market.”

In short, this is a corporate-friendly approach backed by the World Bank Group in which a central authority allocates or sells a limited number of credits to corporations to discharge specific quantities of carbon pollution. Polluters that want to increase their carbon emissions must buy credits from other corporations willing to sell their excess credits. MORE

Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation seeks to stop Syncrude tar sands expansion project

Chief Allan Adam (left) from the Athabasca Fort Chipewyan First Nation chats with Grand Chief Serge Simon from the Mohawks of Kanesatake at a Special Chiefs Assembly in Gatineau Que. on Dec. 8, 2016. Photo by Mike De Souza

The Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation is seeking to block a major oilsands expansion project, adding another Indigenous legal challenge to the region’s resource exploitation.

In a filing to the province’s energy regulator, the First Nation asked to stop the expansion of Syncrude Canada Ltd’s Mildred Lake oilsands operation.

“We can hardly get a boat through the Delta, migratory birds don’t fly over, the fish are diseased, and our people are sick,” said Chief Allan Adam of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, fighting the expansion of Syncrude’s Mildred Lake project.

If approved, the expansion would add around 184,000 barrels of oil per day to Mildred Lake’s production. Hearings on the matter are to be held by the Alberta Energy Regulator in Fort McMurray from Jan. 22-Feb. 8, 2019. MORE

The Tar Sands: It devours our land

A historically willing participant in oilsands operations, the Fort McKay First Nation is taking the Alberta government to court over its failure to protect Moose Lake, a sacred site, from rampant industrial development

Surrounded on three sides by oilsands operations, the Fort McKay First Nation has benefited tremendously from industrial development — while also experiencing firsthand its environmental consequences.

While the nation has historically supported nearby operations, when Prosper Petroleum proposed a 10,000 barrel per day oilsands project near Moose Lake, an area of sacred cultural value for the people of Fort McKay, the community reached a tipping point. MORE

 

 

Why the people of Grassy Narrows continue to eat the fish

a woman by a fireGrassy Narrows elder Judy Da Silva says that fish has always played a vital role in Anishinaabek natal traditions. (Jon Thompson)

The people of Grassy Narrows First Nation know that the fish in nearby rivers and lakes contain mercury, which can cause serious health problems. So why is walleye still a mainstay of their diet? Jon Thompson outlines the cultural, political, and economic issues that have contributed to this community’s crisis. Read more.